A blog to spew unadulterated fandom. Call me Hank. She/Her pronouns

Loving the ladies you hate. Avid multishipper. Occasional writer and reblogger of commentary from a queer/feminist perspective.

If you want to follow me but don't want a particular fandom, I always tag my posts thoroughly for TS.

Currently trending Mass Effect , Pacific Rim and MCU.

Always trending Doctor Who, The Last Airbender, Legend of Zelda, Game of Thrones, Star Trek, Elementary, Good Omens, Animorphs, Tamora Pierce, Avengers, Firefly and Buffy.


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kateelliottsff:

ninjaruski:

It’s about compatibility (x)

This sequence, at least for me, exposed one of the more nuanced elements about “drift compatibility” that wasn’t out right said. When the characters are speaking about the “physical compatibility,” they’re pointing to an ability to attune oneself to the movements and actions of one’s partner. This is made more clear by what Raleigh says about the test: “It’s not a fight, it’s a dialogue.”

The concept of their engagement as a dialogue, or why this demonstrates compatibility, is not readily available in the film, so I figured I’d explain it. The best martial artists are not merely technically skilled, they have acquired an ability to “read” the motions of their opponents and respond appropriately to accomplish their ends. Through constant training with partners, the martial artist acquires a general ability to read the “language” that the body “speaks” in when it engages in action. Obviously, to be able to predict the motions of an opponent before they make them represents a considerable advantage in any combat situation, so the ability to “read” opponents becomes almost fundamental to any skilled practitioner.

Now, Mako has already demonstrated her ability to “read:” when she is observing Raleigh with the other candidates, she points out that Raleigh could have taken any of them several moves earlier, which requires her to be able to read both Raleigh and his partner at the same time. To this end, it says something about the sensitivity cultivated in Mako by her training: Mako can not only read multiple “languages” spoken by bodies, she can interpret and predict where the “conversation” will go. That, alone, intends a level of skill that is extremely advanced.

On Raleigh’s side, he too is an excellent conversationalist. Concerns of plot aside, in order for Raleigh to draw out his fights in such a way that Mako noticed and his partners did not, he would have to be skilled in subtlety of “language” as well as reading the language that his opponent is speaking. Thus, while Raleigh is “reading” his partners like an open book, they seem to have trouble responding in kind. In short, they are less capable of “talking” to Raleigh.

Let’s sum up: bodies speak a “language” which predicts their motions. Skilled practitioners of the martial arts can “read” this language and tell where the “conversation” will go. What does this have to do with compatibility or a dialogue? Everything. When Mako steps onto the mat with Raleigh, they begin to speak to one another in the language of their martial skill: by allowing him the first blow, Mako gets a sense of the language that Raleigh is speaking. Her second attack, which seems to catch Raleigh off guard, is like an interjection: it interrupts what Raleigh is about to say. However, Mako had to be able to “read” Raleigh well enough to know that her interjection would stop him cold.

As the test goes on, the “sentences” get longer and longer, and the responses that Mako has to Raleigh become complimentary as he begins to read her and respond in kind. As the moves go back and forth, both Raleigh and Mako come to understand the “language” that their bodies speak. As they come to better understand their languages, their responses to attacks become more fluid, and soon a dialogue emerges. However, the back and forth can only go on for so long: when Mako’s ability to read Raleigh’s language is what enables her to take the advantage and end with the pin.

As to the comment about “feeling” the compatibility? Between two approximately skilled practitioners, both of whom can “read” the other, a fight takes on a certain flow. This “flow” become present as a felt tension between the two engaged in conversation, a tension that can be maintained through appropriate responses in the fight. Now, breaking the tension comes as a result of error (which neither made) or when one practitioner can anticipate the next “word” in the conversation and move to counter it. This is what Mako did when she concluded the fight.

I would imagine that being able to read and adapt to the body language of one’s co-pilot probably prefigures the degree to which two individuals can engage in the neural handshake: it shows a degree of adaptability to another body that, I think, eases the process of becoming one with another mind, literally.

Now, the mental/emotional aspect is going to be the subject of another post.

Gosh, I really like this analysis. It fits what I was thinking as I watched that scene, which I quite liked on several levels.

(Source: aleriehightower, via confabulatrix)

(Source: fucknooovirmire, via kandros)

tinikah:

Mako Mori (and her umbrella/blue highlights/badass/backstory) was definitely the best part of Pacific room. Too bad the movie centered around the most boring main character in the history of movies

tinikah:

Mako Mori (and her umbrella/blue highlights/badass/backstory) was definitely the best part of Pacific room. Too bad the movie centered around the most boring main character in the history of movies

(via hauntedjaeger)

delazeur answered to your post “I am normally a very thorough tagger but I can’t find the audio post…”

I reblobbed it for you.

Ahhh thankee. My boyf just finished ME3 for the first time and I felt the need to destroy him emotionally. 

I am normally a very thorough tagger but I can’t find the audio post of all the whispers from the ME3 nightmare sequences put together, can anyone help out? There’s too much mass effect on my blog to wade through to find it?

A moment in time (Shenga, G, 800 words)

This is a chapter from the middle of something that I’m writing atm?

Anyway my current thing is kinda turning into a Shenga magnum opus and I’m very slow and too shy to start posting it currently but this chapter kinda works as a one shot and I liked it, so here you go. 

Mid way through the events of ME3. 

There was something nice about the beginning of the day cycle aboard the Normandy.

Of course, there was no true need to adhere to a regular day/night cycle, and James had heard stories of ships that ran on a constant rotating cycle, but Shepard liked the Normandy to have “night time,” so that’s what they did.

It meant that when James awoke with Kaidan gone, there was a sense of restfulness, a period of watching the slight glimmer of the emergency lighting in the shuttle bay, before booted feet of Cortez and other armoury staff clunked down and the bustle of the day cycle began.

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Anonymous asked: I'm not really sure why you felt the need to put something about leaving Garrus in #shakarian. People go into that tag to look for things where they're together, not apart, I promise you. #garrus would make sense, but not #shakarian. You might want to keep that in mind :/

Oh I’m just fussing that he’s such a lovely dude no matter what. Good partners take rejection well, and I romanced him last time. It’s not hate at all but I’m sorry, you’re right, I’ll edit. 

FUcking hell Garrus why do you gotta be such a GENTLEMAN when I’m breAKING UP WITH YOU. FRICK.

bamf-happens:

supersoldiers:

"how to make your crush notice you" by steve rogers

1) Show off your ridiculous shoulder to wait ratio while they have a heart attack on the ground.
2) Mock their pain. 
3) Not so subtly try to work your way into their pants.

bamf-happens:

supersoldiers:

"how to make your crush notice you" by steve rogers

1) Show off your ridiculous shoulder to wait ratio while they have a heart attack on the ground.

2) Mock their pain. 

3) Not so subtly try to work your way into their pants.

(via rogerwilsons)

haiimamermaid:

Me 100% of the time.

haiimamermaid:

Me 100% of the time.

(Source: kwerkyvibes, via delazeur)